Crises, Crises, everywhere you look!

     

crises_everywhere


This is a sampling of the issues included in a single edition {my emphasis!} in late October of the wonderful Risk & Compliance daily newsletter published by the Wall Street Journal:

  • Politicization of the NFL & the Superbowl: With the ‘kneelgate’ controversy still swirling and Nike receiving plaudits/brickbats for adopting Colin Kaepernick in its marketing, the choice of celebrity for the half-time show of the game’s biggest day has become an issue – on this day, Amy Schumer announced she would not wish to star in the show. Now people are asking if a brand runs an advertisement during the game, is it making a political statement!
  • Megyn Kelly flames out at NBC: Even Halloween is now a hot brand issue! Ms Kelly asserts on her show that it’s okay to wear blackface so long as its part of the fun and celebration on the day the whole of America dresses up. By the next morning, her NBC colleagues at the Today show are going on air to explain why she is wrong – among many other outraged viewers. As I write this, Megyn Kelly’s show is cancelled and she is in a full blown legal fight with NBC about her severance.
  • Adidas & the College Basketball Scandal: Unlike the Superbowl and Halloween, which have unexpectedly become sources of risk to brands recently, college athletics in America has long been a hot bed of dubious behavior and bending of rules. But this scandal, which laid bare the extent of the illegal payments and willful avoidance of the rules, is a doozy. Several people are in prison as a result (while the odd and eccentric rule-making of the NCAA is under even greater scrutiny).
  • Wells Fargo (crisis chapter #435!): Another day and another stubbed toe for what was, until about two years ago, one of America’s most admired financial institutions. On this day, the bad news was the departure of two top executives after being named in regulatory warnings by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.
  • State of New York sues Exxon on Climate-Change Disclosures: New York accuses the energy giant of misleading investors about the risks that climate-change regulations pose to its business. The state says that Exxon lied to investors when it claimed to have adequately accounted for greenhouse-gas regulations. The company says it is the victim of lobbying by special interests and political opportunism.

Wow! That’s just one day.

Five major brands – the NFL, NBC, Adidas, Wells Fargo and Exxon.

Five very different risks:

  • Politicization of the Superbowl;
  • Cultural and racial divides in US society;
  • Corruption in student athletics;
  • Regulatory intervention;
  • Impact (if any, say some!) of climate change on our world and business.

Now look at your own crisis preparedness plan - and the technology that will enable you to respond to a threat quickly and effectively.

Still think you are okay?

Still think that old crisis plan will do for another year?

Still think that old 3-ring binder is the best place to store the plan?

The_New_Rules_of_Crisis_Management

About The Author

Mike Hatcliffe is founder and president of The Hatcliffe Group, a reputation, issues and crisis consultancy. Previously, Mike spent nearly 25 years with two of the world's leading PR agencies. Most recently, he spent 10 years at Ogilvy, as managing director of its US corporate practice, and before that 14 years with Ketchum in both the US and the UK. Mike has worked on crisis and reputation assignments with a range of blue chip companies, leaders in their fields, including LG Electronics, Wells Fargo, Carlsberg, Zebra Technologies, CDW, Quintiles, Rockwell Automation, Unilever, Pepsico, Deloitte, Grant Thornton and HSBC.